Table of Contents PRO Demo

Multi-user and multi-blogging

Prior to version 3, WordPress supported one blog per installation, although multiple concurrent copies may be run from different directories if configured to use separate database tables. WordPress Multisites(previously referred to as WordPress Multi-User, WordPress MU, or WPMU) was a fork of WordPress created to allow multiple blogs to exist within one installation but is able to be administered by a centralized maintainer. WordPress MU makes it possible for those with websites to host their own blogging communities, as well as control and moderate all the blogs from a single dashboard. WordPress MS adds eight new data tables for each blog.

As of the release of WordPress 3, WordPress MU has merged with WordPress.

Migration/wp-config.php

WordPress makes migration from one server to another relatively simple due to its use of a configuration file (wp-config.php, usually located in the root directory). This file controls the base settings for a WordPress website including (but not limited to) the database connection settings.Due to the use of a configuration file, migrating from one server to another can be accomplished by the following basic steps:

  • Download a copy of the WordPress files/folders (e.g. via FTP).
  • Download a copy of the associated database (view the ‘DB_NAME’ row in the wp-config.php for the associated database to back up).
  • Upload the files/folders to the new server.
  • Create a new database on the new server and import the sql backup.
  • Update the wp-config.php database fields to reflect.

History

b2/cafelog, more commonly known as b2 or cafelog, was the precursor to WordPress. b2/cafelog was estimated to have been installed on approximately 2,000 blogs as of May 2003. It was written in PHP for use with MySQL by Michel Valdrighi, who is now a contributing developer to WordPress. Although WordPress is the official successor, another project, b2evolution, is also in active development.

WordPress first appeared in 2003 as a joint effort between Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little to create a fork of b2. Christine Selleck Tremoulet, a friend of Mullenweg, suggested the name WordPress.

In 2004 the licensing terms for the competing Movable Type package were changed by Six Apart, resulting in many of its most influential users migrating to WordPress. By October 2009 the Open Source CMS MarketShare Report concluded that WordPress enjoyed the greatest brand strength of any open-source content management system.

As of January 2015, more than 23.3% of the top 10 million websites now use WordPress.

As of February 2016, WordPress is used by 59.1% of all the websites whose content management system we know. This is 25.8% of all websites.